GE Additive and Oerlikon sign MoU for additive manufacturing collaboration

Eleanor Steed
By Eleanor Steed June 27, 2017 12:50

GE Additive and Oerlikon sign MoU for additive manufacturing collaboration

GE Additive, Concept Laser and Arcam have signed a Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) with Oerlikon to collaborate on accelerating the industrialization of additive manufacturing (AM). The agreement includes the provision of additive machines and services to Oerlikon, while Oerlikon becomes a preferred AM component manufacturer and a materials supplier to GE Additive and its affiliated companies. Further, GE and Oerlikon will collaborate on additive machine and materials research and development over the five-year period of the agreement. The MoU was announced at the Paris Air Show.

“GE Additive and Oerlikon both understand the transformative power of additive manufacturing,” said Vice President and General Manager of GE Additive, Mohammad Ehteshami. “This is further proof that the adoption rate of additive is growing rapidly and we’re proud to partner with Oerlikon.”

Dr. Fischer, CEO of Oerlikon said: “Developing innovative technology is key to our growth strategy and a distinct advantage of Oerlikon. We look forward to partnering with GE Additive, Concept Laser and Arcam on innovative AM materials and machines which will strengthen our position in additive manufacturing, and allows us to meet the growing demand for additive components in a variety of industries.”

Additive manufacturing (also called 3D printing) involves taking digital designs from computer aided design (CAD) software, and building them on an additive machine, layer by layer from metal powder. Additive components are typically lighter, more durable and more efficient than traditional casting and forged parts because they can be made as one piece, requiring less welds, joints and assembly. Because additive parts are essentially “grown” from the ground up, they generate far less waste material. Freed of traditional manufacturing restrictions, additive manufacturing dramatically expands the design possibilities for engineers.

Eleanor Steed
By Eleanor Steed June 27, 2017 12:50