APOC Aviation acquires three A320 airframes for part-out in China

Lauren Eldershaw
By Lauren Eldershaw April 12, 2019 14:15

APOC Aviation acquires three A320 airframes for part-out in China

APOC Aviation has acquired three A320 airframes for part-out.  MSN 712, 718 and 720 were formerly acquired by CALC Group (China Aircraft Leasing Group) from China Southern Air Leasing earlier this year.

APOC will retain CALC Group’s MRO joint venture, FL ARI Aircraft Maintenance & Engineering Company (FL ARI) to perform the part-out on the Company’s behalf in CALC’s aircraft recycling facility located in Harbin, China. The process is expected to be completed this summer and after which stock will be strategically offered in the Asia market, or partly shipped to APOC’s warehouse in The Netherlands for sale and used to support AOG requirements 24/7 worldwide.

Jasper van den Boogaard – Director Acquisition & Trading and ISTAT Certified Appraiser at APOC Aviation, says: “This is APOC’s first significant deal in China and the acquisition of these three A320 airframes is indicative of our intention to expand our business in Asia. Using local tear-down specialists maximises cost-efficiency from the outset as concurrently we replenish our stock of universally desirable A320 components, retain value in those parts, and sustain competitive prices.”

Mike Poon – Chief Executive Officer at CALC, says: “We are very pleased to work with APOC Aviation. With the expertise and experience of both teams, we will complete the transactions with flexibility and efficiency. This deal has showcased CALC as a complete aircraft value-chain solutions provider thanks to the abundant resources of the Group’s multiple integrated business platforms.”

APOC Aviation is pursuing a fast-growth strategy and a programme of investment is underway as APOC’s new engine trading division builds engine stock for trading, leasing or teardown with a focus on CFM56-3/5A/5B/7B and V2500-A5 engines. The Company is continually adding to commercial aircraft parts stock through targeted purchase of end-of-life narrow-body airframes.

Lauren Eldershaw
By Lauren Eldershaw April 12, 2019 14:15